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A quick and easy venison recipe

Izaak Walton Report

March 9, 2012
Blaine Kloppenborg , The Daily Freeman Journal

I've got to make good on a promise I made to you several months - that I'd provide you with a couple of my favorite venison recipes. I'm not a very good cook; I'm more like a renegade chef and can cook just barely enough to keep from starving to death. But this recipe is easy, simple and is quick and easy to prepare. And it's good. Really good. It's called Chicken-Fried Deer Steak and served four people.

It requires four 6-ounce deer steaks; one cup flour; salt and black pepper; canola oil for frying. And for the gravy, it requires two tablespoons reserved frying oil; 2 to 3 tablespoons of flour; 1 quart of milk and and additional salt and pepper to taste. This is an excellent recipe for the less-tender venison steak cuts like the ones from da 'tirty-pointer.

Tenderize the steaks by placing them between plastic sheets and pounding them with meat mallet (or other heavy object) until they are double is size. Cut the steak in half and season with salt and pepper, then dredge in flour and let rest. Are you still with me?

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OK, now heat one-quarter inch of oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Dredge the steaks in flour one more time and gently shake off excess. Fry the steaks in the hot oil until they are lightly browned on both sides. Remove to paper towels to drain. Now, pour the oil from the skillet into a small bowl, carefully, letting the brown scrapings from the steak-frying to remain in the pan. Add 2 tablespoons of the reserved oil back into the skillet and gently heat, scraping up the browned bits. Slowly stir in the 2 to 3 tablespoons of flour and continue to cook and stir over low heat until it just begins to turn brown - about 3 minutes. Stir in the milk, a little at a time, until it is incorporated smoothly with the roux. Bring to a gentle boil over medium heat. Stirring often. Continue cooking and stirring until the gravy has thickened. Season with salt and pepper and pour over the fried steaks and your favorite style of mashed potatoes.

Congratulations to you with freezers filled with venison. May it be tasty and nourishing.

First robin sighting

Well guess what? Last Saturday afternoon, I was out driving around the country-side, looking for "outdoor stuff," as I quite often do, and all of a sudden, out of nowhere, I saw it. There is was, I observed the first sighting of a robin this spring. To me - to my way of thinking - the arrival of the first robin is always the first sign - a harbinger, if you will, of spring. The early bird was seen way out on the ed of the driving range at the Links Golf Course. At the time, the temperature was a bone-chilling 30 degrees accompanied by a stiff northwest wind. I'll bet he (or she) wishes it had remained down south a few more days. Oh well, as the old saying goes: "The early bird gets the worm."

Eagles laying eggs

DECORAH (AP) - The online world is flocking again to see the newest eggs being laid by a famous northeast Iowa eagle family. The feathered family has gained international attention because of an Internet nest-cam set up by the Raptor Resource Project. The website that allows people to watch has been viewed nearly 217 million times. Raptor Resource Project researcher Bob Anderson said new equipment installed I October will give viewers an even better look at the eagle family this year. From one to three bluish-white eggs will be laid. I'm told you can go online at www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

Hunting seasons of note

Rabbit (cottontail) season closed last week, Feb. 28. The second crow season (Jan. 14 through March 31) is still on. Pigeon season is still open, but closes March 31. Coyote season is continuously open as is groundhog season. Light Goose Conservation Order (white and blue phase snow geese and Ross' geese) season runs from Jan. 14 to April 15. Check additional regulations before going hunting. Be advised the daily limit is 20 light geese. There is no possession limit. Hunters may use electronic callers and unplugged shotguns during the Light Goose Conservation Order. Furbearer Trapping Season is all but over. The beaver season remains open until April 15 (no daily limit and no possession limit). It is my understanding that the bobcat season is now closed. The open zone (eligible counties) quota was about 350 bobcats, plus any that are trapped up to midnight of the following day after the quota is reached. The season bobcat limit is one bobcat per licensed fur harvester, regardless if it was hunted or trapped.

And now, have a good weekend.

 
 

 

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